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Keep up with some of the latest ANIC news by friending us on Facebook. The ANIC Facebook page is where we share some of our cute ANIC cases, talk about the latest ANIC events and inform pet owners of local animal events in the community.

We have an exciting upcoming event in two weeks that is being partially sponsored by the ANIC, with proceeds supporting the National Police Dog Foundation. There will be a pet costume contest, raffles, food and craft beer! Please see the official flyer in the photo below. ...

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1 month ago

The Animal Neurology & Imaging Center

Chelsey is a young poodle who first came to the ANIC at the beginning of the summer for signs of extreme lethargy and imbalance episodes. When she first came to us she was in bad shape. She was very dull with decreased responsiveness, unable to walk, and had signs of dysfunction of the balance centers within her brain. She was also showing signs of high intracranial pressure and needed emergency medications. We were able to stabilize her, and her family elected to pursue MRI in order to get a better understanding of what was causing her signs. On MRI, we found multifocal changes throughout her brain which made the neurology team very concerned for an inflammatory process (called encephalitis). You can see images of Chelsey’s MRI with arrows demonstrating some of those changes (white fluffy lesions compared to the darker grey of normal brain tissue).

In dogs, inflammation in the brain falls into two major categories and is caused by either an autoimmune/immune-mediated process (which is the case for the majority of young small breed dogs like Chelsey) or an infectious disease. Immune mediated diseases occur when the body makes a mistake and thinks it’s own cells (in Chelsey’s case the brain tissue) are invaders and responds by creating and immune system response to eliminate the “invading” cells. Infectious processes occur due to a break in the body’s defenses allowing an infectious organism into the brain. It is very important for us to try to distinguish between infection and immune-mediated diseases because the treatment for the two are almost completely opposite. With infection we need to provide specific medications while supporting the immune system. However, with an auto-immune process, we initiate treatment to dramatically reduce the immune system’s attack on the body’s own tissues.

In many cases, we can use information from a spinal tap to confirm our suspicion (and sometimes identify infectious organisms) of inflammatory disease, but this wasn’t possible in Chelsey’s case because of her high intracranial pressure. We did perform infectious disease testing which allowed us to rule out the most common types of infections that could cause her signs and MRI changes. After receiving her negative infectious disease results we were able to give medications to immunosuppress Chelsey. She has shown rapid and dramatic improvements. At her most recent recheck her mom was so happy to have her best friend back. Chelsey is like a brand new dog, and after almost two months on treatment has continued to do wonderfully! Chelsey is pictured below with her mom and our very own Dr. Passmore at her 6 week recheck this past month when she had a normal neurologic exam. Way to go Chelsey!
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2 months ago

The Animal Neurology & Imaging Center

www.facebook.com/78238614116/posts/10155930038299117/

Canterbury Park
#ICYMI Here are the #BassetHound races from earlier today presentedy by Kwik Trip #FloppyEars
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2 months ago

The Animal Neurology & Imaging Center

Exciting news from ANIC Arizona!

Our in house MRI is 100% complete! We have waited so long to offer in-house imaging that it almost seems surreal. Having the access to this equipment right here in our hospital has dramatically increased our efficiency and allowed us time to see more cases and scan more pets!

Along with the great news of the in-house MRI, we are proud to announce the addition of Dr. Anne Chauvet, DACVIM (Neurology) to our team!

Dr. Chauvet was born in France, but raised in Africa. She graduated from veterinary school in 1990 in Saskatchewan, Canada, completed an internship in 1991 in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery at the University of Illinois and a residency in Neurology/Neurosurgery at UC Davis in 1993. In 1997, while on staff at the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Dr. Chauvet started Veterinary Neuro Services and later moved the company to the Gulf Coast of Florida.

Dr. Chauvet has received numerous business awards over the years. She is the creator of the Basic Science Course in Veterinary and Comparative Neurology/Neurosurgery now known as “brain camp”. Dr. Chauvet founded a not-for-profit organization and assisted others. Her passions are to educate and make a difference. Her interests are hyperbaric medicine, minimally invasive procedure and all neurosurgery.

Remaining active in her local community, she continues to lecture internationally and promote the arena of veterinary education and consultations on an international level.

We are so excited to bring her on board to our Neurology Department!

For more updates, please visit our main hospital page at
www.facebook.com/AnimalMedicalandSurgicalCenterNorthScottsdale/
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The ANIC is proud to introduce the newest member of our staff.
Dr. Mary Stallings grew up in southern California, where she developed an early appreciation for veterinary neurology, growing up around pets with seizures and disk disease- this has helped her relate to the difficulties clients can face with the management of these diseases. Her formal education started with her graduating with a B.S. in Animal Science from University of California, Davis. She spent several years working in a neurobiology research facility before deciding to fulfill her childhood dream of becoming a veterinarian. She returned to UC Davis, this time to the School of Veterinary Medicine, and graduated with her doctorate in 2015. From there, she ventured to the University of Missouri Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a rotating internship. This was followed by a neurology internship at SAGE Centers for Veterinary Emergency and Specialty Care in the San Francisco Bay area. Most recently, she completed a second neurology internship with Bush Veterinary Neurology Service in Richmond, VA. Dr. Stallings is excited to have returned west and join the ANIC as a neurology hospitalist prior to residency training. She credits her soaring success to the unconditional love of her four-legged family, including her English Pointer, Basil, and her Calico kitty, Liz.
When she is not studying or working at the clinic, Dr. Stallings enjoys exploring new wineries, museums and restaurants with her fiancé, Tim. She also enjoys reading (yes, even textbooks), playing board games, baking, and watching Packers football.
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3 months ago

The Animal Neurology & Imaging Center

Reduce, reuse, recycle lol

Wimp.com
$800 sweaters from dog hair.

(via: 60 Second Docs Presents)
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On June 9th, we told you the story of Milton, the sweet terrier that presented for the inability to use his hind limbs. The first video in this series shows his status 4 days following surgery. He has the ability to use his hind limbs (yay!), but he is not able to support his own weight completely, he is unstable on his feet, and he scuffs them fairly frequently. The second video in the series shows him 15 days after his operation. He is supporting himself well with little-to-no help from his human, he doesn’t stumble, and he doesn’t appear to be scuffing his feet! Of course, that tail of his never stopped moving, and we hope it doesn’t stop anytime soon.

Video/Photo credit to Milton's owner; Music: "Kitty in the Window" by Podington Bear
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